ASUS ROG THOR 1200W Power Supply Review

ASUS is getting back into the computer power supply game in a big way. Today we have the Republic of Gamers Thor 1200 that promises to allow you to "HARNESS THUNDER." This is a massive 1200 watt PSU and the first thing that will catch your eye is the OLED panel that will tell you just how much power you're using at the moment.

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Build Quality

As we already know the ASUS ROG THOR 1200W features a single 120mm fan design that is used in the same vein as 120mm fans in that these can provide for quiet cooling environments due to the ability to move a larger volume of air at slower speeds than a smaller diameter fan. The 140mm fan is just about the largest diameter fan we are likely to see in ATX power supplies given the physical constraints of the form factor. While great for quiet computing environments the key criteria in our evaluation is whether or not the cooling solution is sufficient, not necessarily it’s sound output level or form factor, although we certainly listen for offending units.

External Build Quality

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The exterior of the ASUS ROG THOR 1200W is similar to what we have seen from other power supplies in that it has the same general shape, it has a black base coat, it has a modular interface, a large overhead fan, and APFC. The details, however, are fairly unique to this unit. Among the interesting things we see here is the ROG branding on the chamfered corner, the OLED power display, the glowing ROG logo, the fanless mode on/off switch, and the unique fan grill design. All of this is coupled with a high quality finish so this portion of the unit is very striking indeed!

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The ASUS ROG THOR 1200W itself is ~7 3/8 inches long while the cables provide a serviceable length of ~18 to 28 inches to the first or only connector. The sleeving on these cables is a total disaster. Not only do we have to deal with individually sleeved cables today but we also have cables that feature a flat FlexForce style as well as standard sleeving. That is THREE different types of cables, which is ridiculous, and one TERRIBLE to work with type. The individually sleeved ones are already not great to work with but now, no matter what you do, this is just going to look like a random grab bag of crap connected to your components. Who thought this was a good idea? Now, what would have been a good idea if you were going to go this route would be to have had all of the cables available in all three types and let users choose what was going to work best in various situations or the type they prefer. Sure, that would cost more but this unit is already carrying a price premium as a flagship product and you would not be stuck using all three types if you have a decently well appointed system like you are today.

Internal Build Quality

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Once we open the ASUS ROG THOR 1200W, we see a power supply that is based off of the Seasonic PRIME series like we saw in the PRIME 1200W Platinum. The biggest differences are the changes in heatsinks used to match the ROG branding and the inclusion of the necessary circuitry for the OLED and ROG lights. Otherwise, the topology is a resonant LLC primary with a synchronous rectification secondary and DC-DC VRMs for the minor rails. From the top, we see four rather large heatsinks paired with a dual ball bearing Power Logic fan rated at 0.4A at 12v. When we flip the very red PCB over, we see the typically neat soldering of Seasonic as well as the 12v MOSFETs.

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Moving on to the primary side, the ROG THOR 1200W's input filtering begins once more like the other PRIME based units we have seen up on the housing itself with a PCB in a metal housing (but not a self contained can). This housing contains X capacitors, Y capacitors, and a coil. The input filtering then trails onto the main PCB where we find that it is complete. The bridge rectifiers are found next and they are attached to one of the large "ROG THERMAL SOLUTION" heatsinks. As we move around to the primary side proper, we find a coil along with the APFC power components on another "ROG THERMAL SOLUTION" heatsink. Behind this heatsink, we find the main input capacitors which are provided by Hitachi. These capacitors are rated at 400v 470uF 105C and 400v 820uF 105C which is a bit larger than what we saw on the related PRIME 1200W Platinum. Besides these capacitors, we also see the main switchers attached to the heatsink towards the center of the PCB.

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Moving over to the "secondary side," we see the same general design we have seen in all of the other PRIME based units we have reviewed, but we do, also, see a few changes. First up, the heatsinks here are a pair of "ROG THERMAL SOLUTION" heatsinks as opposed to the usual Seasonic design. That said, these heatsinks are still used for helping to cool the 12v MOSFETS and these components also use the case housing as part of the overall cooling scheme. Next to this, we again see the DC-DC VRMs behind the input capacitors. These VRMs are housed on an add-in PCB. Populating this PCB are some solid capacitors from FPCAP. Additionally, throughout the secondary, we see a number of Nippon Chemi-con standard and solid capacitors. Also a bit different from previous PRIME based units, we see there are some add-in PCBs today that house the various controllers needed to drive the OLED display and the other lighting options as well as the output protection on the very edge of the main PCB. Moving to the modular PCB, we see that it is very well constructed with very clean soldering. On the connector side, we see a number of solid capacitors here provided by FPCAP and some standard electrolytics from Nippon Chemi-con.

Build Quality Summary

The overall build quality of the ROG THOR 1200W is excellent which shouldn't be that surprising given what we have seen from all of the other PRIME based units from Seasonic. However, this was our first go with an ASUS branded product and ASUS did order up a number of customization's that could present many places for things to go wrong. However, things went swimmingly. Getting down to more specific details, subjectively, the exterior of this unit features a unique look and features that certainly bring home the ROG branding that ASUS is going for in spades. While most units we see have a very similar aesthetic (with the basic black box that is the new flat grey of the 90s and early 00s), ASUS has done a good job breaking that mold. Well, a great job until we got to the cabling which is an absolute unmitigated disaster. I would like to think that the reason why this is what we see is that NO ONE actually did check into this and sign off on it.

Editor's note: I see the various cable types a bit differently than Paul does. I personally like ASUS paying attention to using different types of cables for different connectors, as I think this makes cables easier to run inside a case. It is truly not a one-size-fits-all environment. From an aesthetics point of view, I can see where this might bother you when it is outside the case sitting on a workbench, but being OCD about the cables once these are all hidden inside your build is truly not going to be of concern to many system builders.

With the interior build quality, we see a modern design that is extremely well executed. Part of this excellent execution is the excellent attention to detail when it comes to component placement and soldering which is more important today than with any other PRIME unit before as we have much bulkier heatsinks and extra add-in PCBs. The component selection is again high end today as we see a Power Logic dual ball bearing fan along with capacitors from Nippon Chemi-con (solid and standard), FPCAP (solid), and Hitachi (standard). All in all, everything here seems to be up to both Seasonic and ASUS' standards. Let's move on to the load tests and see how this unit does there.