Enermax MaxTytan 1250W Power Supply Review

The MaxTytan is the flagship product in the lineup of Enermax power supplies. This is the largest capacity it builds and promises to deliver excellent efficiency. Semi-fanless features makes sure this PSU stays quiet up to ~70% load. It also has a very unique feature in that it will show you the power wattage being delivered on an LCD panel right on the PSU.

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Build Quality

As we already know the Enermax MaxTytan 1250W features a single 139mm fan design that is used in the same vein as 120mm fans in that these can provide for quiet cooling environments due to the ability to move a larger volume of air at slower speeds than a smaller diameter fan. The 139mm fan is just short of the largest diameter fan we are likely to see in ATX power supplies given the physical constraints of the form factor. While great for quiet computing environments the key criteria in our evaluation is whether or not the cooling solution is sufficient, not necessarily it’s sound output level or form factor, although we certainly listen for offending units.

External Build Quality

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In general, the exterior of the Enermax MaxTytan 1250W looks like what we saw from the MaxTytan 800W. As the word identical was not used above, that means there are a few tweaks here today. Those tweaks include things like the way that the modular interface is accented/delineated and the presence of the "wattage meter" on the rear of the unit. Otherwise, the design elements we saw previously carry forward today including the embossing and the finish is once more very rugged/textured with an almost powder coat like finish further accented in silver/platinum.

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The Enermax MaxTytan 1250W itself is ~7 7/8 inches long while the cables provide a serviceable length of ~20 to 29 inches to the first or only connector. The sleeving on these cables is all the individually sleeved form (called Sleemax by Enermax). This sleeving may look nice to some people, but it generally makes these cables hugely bulky and easily tangled resulting in a mess. Much like the last few times we have reviewed a unit with individually sleeved cables, they were a nightmare to work with during testing as they were constantly tangling. Lots of people do prefer form over function though, so these cables likely will be popular once again.

Internal Build Quality

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Once we open the Enermax MaxTytan 1250W, we see a power supply that looks very familiar as it is another revision of the CWT CST platform similar to the Thermaltake Toughpower iRGB Plus 1250W and the Platimax DF 1200W which were both close in capacity to this unit. As such, the topology used again today has a full bridge LLC resonant design and the secondary features synchronous rectification and DC-DC VRMs for the minor rails. In addition to this, we see three small heatsinks. This is paired with a 139mm fan which is an Enermax branded/built Twister Bearing fan rated at 0.3A at 12v. One of the final things we see on the top of the unit that is interesting is that the main transformers are labeled Thermaltake and this is an Enermax branded unit. It seems that CWT might have made a boo-boo here. When we flip the unit over, we see that the soldering looks to be generally good with only a few hand done touch ups.

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When we look at the rear of the MaxTytan 1250W we see the wattage meter and the input filtering. The input filtering for the MaxTytan 1250W begins by the AC input receptacle with a couple of Y capacitors. The input filtering then trails onto the main PCB. As we move a bit past the input filtering, we come to the first heatsink which houses the bridge rectifiers in an arrangement where they are sandwiching the heatsink. Moving around the rest of the way to the primary side, we see the heatsink that houses the PFC components and a pair of coils next to an add-in PCB for the primary side controllers. We also see the add-in PCB which houses the +5vsb circuit. Towards the middle of the main PCB, we find the PWM controller and the main input capacitors. These capacitors are provided by Nippon Chemi-con and Nichicon and they are rated at 420v 560uF 105C and 400v 680uF 105C.

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Moving on to the secondary, we find the Thermaltake marked transformers in the middle of the unit which are directly attached to a pair of PCBs which house the 12v MOSFETs. Next to this we find a small heatsink with the switchers. We also find, just past this area up against the edge of the main PCB, the DC-DC VRMs which are housed on an add-in PCB. Scattered around this area we see some Nippon Chemi-con standard capacitors along with Apaq and Nippon Chemi-con solid capacitors. When we look at the back of the modular PCB, we see that it is decently well done but there are some rework sections of soldering here today. Moving to the front of the modular PCB, we see that it is very cleanly constructed and there are a number of Apaq solid capacitors here.

Build Quality Summary

The Enermax MaxTytan 1250W’s build quality is generally very good as we have seen from this platform before. The exterior of the MaxTytan 1250W starts things off in fine form as usual since Enermax has started using this kind of finish and, more recently, branding style. So, there are very few things that Enermax could do much better here unless they started from scratch with their branding. Now, one downside to this unit if you work with it as we do during testing is the cabling. For what we do, the individually sleeved cables are unnecessarily bulky, messy, and constantly getting tangled. However, they do look cool so certainly many people will tolerate their unwieldiness for the look. When we move to the interior, the build quality continues to be generally very good with a modern topology. The component selection is also excellent as we see things like Nippon Chemi-con and Nichicon standard capacitors throughout. After that, the solid capacitor selection is better than what we have seen in some other CST based units as we see Nippon Chemi-con and Apaq represented here. We also get an Enermax branded Twister Bearing fan which is definitely excellent. Slightly less excellent though is the slip-up someone at CWT made with leaving Thermaltake branding on the guts of this unit. It doesn't affect anything, but it is kind of "interesting." Let’s move on to the load testing now and see how this unit does there!