Cooler Master Real Power Pro 1000W PSU 10 Year Redux

Doing computer PSU reviews for over a decade, and keeping full documentation on those, gives us ability to do something that whets computer PSU enthusiasts' appetites. We get to take some of those PSUs that have been in service for 10 years and retest those. Cooler Master is back on the load bank! How does it look after a decade of service?

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Load Testing

For those of you that are curious as to some of the reasoning and equipment behind our PSU testing program here at HardOCP, we have put together a living document that shares a lot of the behind the scenes of the program. The testing we are conducting today is exactly as described in that document and will begin with a range of loads tested at 120v input including our torture test and then move on to the same set of tests at 100v input but without the torture test.

120v Load Testing Results Initial

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120v Load Testing Results After 10 Years of Service

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Test #1 is equal to approximately 25% of the rated capacity of the Real Power Pro 1000W at 45C. This makes Test #1 equal to ~250W by loading the 12v rails to 20a, the 5v rail to 2a, the 3.3v rail to 1a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. The results of Test #1 see the 5v and 3.3v rails all starting off within 0.01v of where they did in our original testing. The 12v rails show a bit more variation as they are coming in lower by between 0.02v and 0.04v compared to our previous evaluation. The efficiency has shed only ~0.34% in the time between when we tested the Real Power Pro 1000W originally and today.

Test #2 is equal to approximately 50% of the rated capacity of the Real Power Pro 1000W at 45C. This makes Test #2 equal to ~500W by loading the 12v rails to 40a, the 5v rail to 4a, the 3.3v rail to 2a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. Test #2 sees the 12v rail drop by up to 0.06v, the 5v rail drop by 0.02v, and 3.3v drop by 0.03v compared to Test #1 in our retest compared which is a bit of an increase compared to the changes we saw in our initial testing. When we look at the efficiency, we see that there again seems to have been a rather minor decline over the last 10 years as the difference is ~0.77%.

Test #3 is equal to approximately 75% of the rated capacity of the Real Power Pro 1000W at 45C. This makes Test #3 equal to ~750W by loading the 12v rails to 58a, the 5v rail to 6a, the 3.3v rail to 3a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. In Test #3, we see the 12v readings drop more today than they did in our initial testing 10 years ago by up to 0.07v now versus 0.04v before. The 5v rail dropped by just 0.01v and the 3.3v rail dropped by 0.02v previously 0.03v and 0.04v respectively. Once more, we also see that the efficiency has declined from our initial test to our retest today but this time it is by ~0.43%.

Test #4 is equal to approximately 100% of the rated capacity of the Real Power Pro 1000W at 45C. This makes Test #4 equal to ~1000W by loading the 12v rails to 80a, the 5v rail to 2a, the 3.3v rail to 1a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. In the final regular test, the full load test, we see the greatest difference today. Whereas this unit was able to complete this test 10 years ago, today this unit is unable to complete our full load test at 45C and will no longer restart.

Load Testing Summary

The results for the Cooler Master Real Power Pro 1000W's today might be a bit more surprising if we had not previously seen the SilverStone Olympia 1000W during a retest 7.5 years after we first reviewed it. That said, our results today with the Real Power Pro 1000W are still interesting as we see that, while the general trend in how the units aged is similar, the details are a bit different.

Obviously, the most striking result today is that this unit is no longer able to complete the full load test even though it did so ~10 years ago. Unlike with the SilverStone Olympia 1000W though, I was unable to rerun this test at room temp because once this unit shut off at full load it never would restart. There was no visible sign of failure when the unit was examined. Now, while the unit was running, the voltage regulation that was saw in our retest today was a bit different from what we saw ~10 years ago as the 12v rail dropped by up to 0.13v today versus up to 0.07v, the 5v rail dropped by 0.05v versus 0.02v, and the 3.3v rail dropped by 0.07v versus 0.02v. While none of those changes are large in absolute values, in a relative sense they are as they do increase to more than double what we saw previously.

That said, I would still hesitate to draw a final conclusion today since the unit was unable to complete testing and give us a full picture of what was going on at all of our previous loads. Now, when we move over to the efficiency side of things, we see that in the retest today the Real Power Pro 1000W has seen a decline in efficiency, as well, with changes that range from 0.34% to 0.77% below what we saw 10 years ago. That is, perhaps, not that bad as we saw a bit more dramatic of a change the last time we did one of these retests. Overall then, we are definitely seeing some differences in this specific sample after 10 years of service and, so far, those differences are not good. Let's move on now to the 100v tests and see what we have there.