IceMan Ryzen Threadripper CPU Water Block Review

IceMan Cooler is not exactly a well known name in North America, but in December we had a few folks ask for a review of its Threadripper water block, so we reached out, and IceMan sent us its water block. Everything looked great till we tried to use it. And of course being able to use it is slightly important, if you want to cool your Threadripper.

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IceMan Threadripper Water Block

A 2mm and 2.5mm hex wrench are needed to fully tear down the IceMan water block. Once you get it open, you will most likely be impressed as the inside looks as well done as the outside.

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The cold-plate is a solid piece of copper fully machined then nickel plated. The machining on the micro-fins is extremely well done and what you might again consider "perfect." The fins however are a bit thicker than what we have seen with other blocks of this caliber.

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As noted the mating surface is excellent, and please keep in mind here that these pictures were taken after we did our mounting tests.

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Two things are of concern here. First and foremost, the micro-fin footprint is not large enough to fully cover the area of the Threadripper dies. Also, as we discussed in the video, the flow runs lengthwise along the dies rather than across the shorter path side-to-side. This has shown to not cool as well with other blocks we reviewed last year, as well as the last block we reviewed from WaterCool.

The O-ring channel is deep enough to hold it in place when you go to put it all back together.

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The top-block is as impressive as the cold-plate. The machining is again near-perfect and brings an overall quality look to the block. My only complaint is that a bit of debris was left attached after the threads had been cut which if course could break off and get into your cooling loop. These however are cleaned up easily, if you make the effort, which I would suggest you do if you find this in your block. That said, we would suggest you open every block you buy for inspection before plumbing it into your loop.

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I am always a bit put off when I see these flow-plates that look like this. All nice and polished on one side, and the other side looks like you had it under your shoe sliding it down the road. Now, it makes no real difference, it just seems to show a cost savings attempt, which is not necessarily a bad thing. But if the manufacturer is penny-pinching on this part, what else is being put to the same cost saving standard?

The flow-plate is keyed so that you cannot put it in incorrectly, which is a good thing. This also helps when you go to put the block back together.

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The block's top-plate is well finished and seems to be a heavy paint or powder coating. The plate is not just decorative however, as it hides the wiring for the Frag Harder Disco Lights and all the other fasteners. The top-plate screws into the acrylic, however you do not need to use any heavy torque on these fasteners. The fasteners that count are countersunk into the acrylic top-block and are threaded into the copper cold-plate, so you can put sufficient torque on these fasteners and not worry about stripping any plastic threads.

The hold-down screws that thread directly into the TR4 socket use a C-clip to hold these in place which is a very nice touch as you will not find yourself losing these like on some other blocks.

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