EVGA 430W Power Supply Review

EVGA has been hit and miss when it comes to PSUs. While it has produced some stinkers in the past, we have recently seen at least one excellent quality product from EVGA. So when we saw its 430W unit billed as having "UNBEATABLE VALUE" and is rated at 40C for full power operation, we knew we had to buy it.

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Transient Testing

The Transient Testing portion of this review marks the first revision to our living testing methodology. Readers can read more about this inclusion in our testing here in our methodology section, but briefly we will be examining the response of the power supply to a short duration load such as a RAID array spinning up or load change due to power draw from video cards etc. Ideally we would not see a deflection from the baseline voltage output when this occurs but that is simply not the case for the majority. We will be using the ATX12v specification for transient response as a guide.

The Transient Load Tester adds an additional 9.25A to the 12v rail for 10ms and an additional 3.75A to the 5v rail for 10ms at 25% total load and 50% total load.

Loaded/Unloaded

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12v/5v

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Test #1 is equal to approximately 25% of the rated capacity of the 430W at 45c. This makes Test #1 equal to 112W by loading the 12v rail to 7a, the 5v rail to 2a, the 3.3v rail to 1a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.3a before the addition of the transient load. The results of Test #1 show a ~420mV drop on the loaded 12v rail and ~140mV drop on the loaded 5v rail. At the same time that 12v load was being triggered, the 5v rail measured a ~70mV drop.

Loaded/Unloaded

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12v/5v

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Test #2 is equal to approximately 50% of the rated capacity of the 430W at 45c. This makes Test #2 equal to 215W by loading the 12v rail to 15a, the 5v rail to 3a, the 3.3v rail to 2a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.3a before the addition of the transient load. The results of Test #2 show a ~440mV drop on the loaded 12v rail and ~140mV drop on the loaded 5v rail. At the same time that 12v load was being triggered, the 5v rail measured a ~75mV drop.

Transient Load Testing Summary

The Transient Load Testing results for the EVGA 430W are passing but the results are definitely in that "ho-hum" to not good range again. Overall, during testing, the EVGA 430W is seeing a peak loaded 12v change of ~440mV which is larger than what we saw from EVGA 500B and that makes sense as this unit is smaller in capacity. When we look at the loaded 5v response, we see that the EVGA 430W has a peak change of ~140mV and the unloaded 5v during a 12v load dropped by ~75mV, which is mixed compared to the EVGA 500B. Now, when we look at comparable units, we again see that the Zalman ZM450-US is the only real comparable unit we have seen in any length of time and this unit ends up mixed compared to that unit. So, we have this unit once more coming in it a dead heat with a dead Zalman. Let's move on now to the DC output quality to see if this unit looks any better in that aspect than it has so far in other aspects of testing.