Raidmax RX-1000AE 1000W Power Supply Review

Raidmax touts its new RX-1000AE as being a PSU that is "environmentally friendly." Given the fact that it boasts an 80 Plus Gold Certified rating, it is poised to supply us with some of the best efficiency levels we have ever seen out of PSU, much less one that hits the 1 kilowatt mark.

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Build Quality

As we already know the Raidmax RX-1000AE features a single 135mm fan design that is used in the same vein as 120mm fans in that they can provide for quiet cooling environments due to the ability to move a larger volume of air at slower speeds than a smaller diameter fan. The 135mm fan is just short of the largest diameter fan we are likely to see in ATX power supplies given the physical constraints of the form factor. While great for quiet computing environments the key criteria in our evaluation is whether or not the cooling solution is sufficient, not necessarily it’s sound output level or form factor, although we certainly listen for offending units.

External Build Quality

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The exterior of the RX-1000AE is trimmed out in the same kind of tough black textured finish that we have seen on a lot of power supplies these days and, overall, the unit looks good. The top of the unit is dominated by perhaps its most interesting feature in the hexagonal fan grill which covers the units lone white 135mm fan. The front of the unit features the fixed wiring exiting from a single location and a modular interface next to it that is delineated by labeling that indicates which connector is for which cable (which is kind of important since all of the connectors are physically interchangeable). Lastly, the rear of the unit looks as it has on many APFC designs before and it is well perforated for exhaust.

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The Raidmax RX-1000AE we are looking at today comes in at an overall length of ~6 1/2 inches while all of the cables provide serviceable lengths of ~19 inches (~480mm) to the first or only connector. The cables are all sleeved back into the housing (for the fixed cables) and are generally well constructed.

Internal Build Quality

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Once we open the Raidmax RX-1000AE we begin having flashbacks to the X4 850W/1050W as these units all share the basic topology from Andyson. Indeed, the units vary in only minor ways from one another which raises a number of interesting questions given the X4 series' mediocre overall performance and horrendous flop at meeting its 80Plus claimed efficiency. Hopefully, much more than the fan being actually branded Young Lin Tech and rated at 3W at 12v has changed here, otherwise this unit is going to be a wild ride today. Among the things that we can tell have not changed right off the bat is the very mediocre soldering, great. Perhaps Andyson just isn’t capable of doing a better job than this mediocrity?

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Moving over to the primary side, we see the same double forward topology and layout that we saw with the X4 units. In this layout, the outside heatsink houses the bridge rectifier and the PFC power components while inner houses the main switching transistors. The primary capacitor is similar to what we saw on the 1050W X4 as it is rated at 420v 560uF 105C and provided by Matsushita.

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As we look at the secondary for the Raidmax RX-1000AE, we see three coils indicating that the unit is an independently regulated design. The capacitors filling out the secondary are all from Teapo and we see them sprouting up through the wiring. The wiring is all bundled and routed over to the modular interface. The rear of the modular interface features the same mediocre quality soldering that we saw on the main PCB, color me unsurprised. When we then flip over to the front of the modular PCB we see a few solid capacitors from Teapo stuck on here as well, but this side at least looks better than the back. Lastly, we see that the add-in PCB houses the output protection circuitry (OCP, OVP, SCP, etc) and we see right next to that PCB the solder points indicating that this design is a multi-12v arrangement as detailed on the previous page.

Build Quality Summary

The Raidmax RX-1000AE is rather typical of what we have come to expect from Andyson built units as the exterior of the unit is excellent, while the interior has some serious missteps. The exterior of the unit is finished in the slightly textured tough black finish that we have seen become extremely popular the last few years and with the units hexagonal fan grill it makes for a slightly unique but attractive package. The modular cables are all well constructed and the unit has the fixed cables sleeved into the housing and incorporates a wire guard (this may not seem like much, but some much more expensive OEMs such as Delta can’t seem to be bothered to do this so props to Andyson at least for making an effort here). Things go downhill a bit when we open the unit however, and we see that while stocked with a Matsushita capacitor on the primary side and Teapo capacitors (standard and solid) on the secondary side, the integration looks sloppy. In fact, the usual poor soldering we see from Andyson once more rears its ugly head in this unit. It seems that Andyson just isn’t going to do any better than this unless BFG (now defunct) is pushing for better quality. Let’s move now and see how this unit performs with its only "meh" integration in our load tests.