Today's Hard|Forum Post
Today's Hard|Forum Post

Thermaltake ToughPower 1200W

Having a PSU that is rated at 1200 watts is a big deal. Having a PSU that will give you 1200 watts under stressful conditions is quite another. We put the Toughpower 1200w into the oven and see if it stands up to its 1200 watt power claims. Don't miss this one.

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Load Testing

For those of you that are curious as to some of the reasoning and equipment behind our PSU testing program here at HardOCP, we have put together a living document that shares a lot of the behind the scenes of the program. The testing we are conducting today is exactly as described in that document and will begin with a range of loads tested at 120v input including our torture test and then move on to the same set of tests at 100v input but without the torture test.

120v Load Testing Results

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Test #1 is equal to approximately 25% of the rated capacity of the Toughpower 1200w at 45c. This makes Test #1 equal to 301w by loading the 12v rails to a combined 20a, the 5v rail to 6a, the 3.3v rail to 4a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. The results of Test #1 show the Toughpower is starting off right were it should voltage wise. The efficiency is an amazing ~86% during Test #1. This is an amazing efficiency value and since most power supplies actually have a roughly bell like curve to their efficiency that peaks around 50% load the claims of 87% by Thermaltake may indeed come true.

Test #2 is equal to approximately 50% of the rated capacity of the Toughpower 1200w at 45c. This makes Test #2 equal to 609w by loading the 12v rails to a combined 42a, the 5v rail to 12a, the 3.3v rail to 8a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. Test #2 showed only marginal voltage drops across the board with a doubling of the load. Exhaust temperature was up 2c over ambient and the efficiency rose to 87.5% which has hit the advertised 87% value. That is indeed a refreshing sight.

Test #3 is equal to approximately 75% of the rated capacity of the Toughpower 1200w at 45c. This makes Test #3 equal to 913w by loading the 12v rail to 64a, the 5v rail to 18a, the 3.3v rail to 12a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. Test #3 sees only marginal voltages drop and the values are still well within specification while our efficiency drops back below 87%, but only barely hitting 86.95%. Finally our exhaust temperature is only up to 49c a 2c rise over Test #2.

Test #4 is equal to approximately 100% of the rated capacity of the Toughpower 1200w at 45c. This makes Test #4 equal to 1199w by loading the 12v rail to 90a, the 5v rail to 15a, the 3.3v rail to 10a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. In our final regular test we find that the voltages have dropped some again but the values are still within specifications and the 12v in particular now has an extremely heavy load at 90a. The exhaust temperature has topped out at 51c and efficiency is still running in the mid 80%’s at ~86%.

The performance figures put forward by the Toughpower in the 120v testing are nothing short of amazing. The output voltages on the 12v rails dropped less than 0.3v over a 90A spread. It is incredible that the Thermaltake Toughpower 1200w can produce 90A on the 12v rails let alone do it at 45c and with such stellar efficiency. The efficiency numbers are another set of feathers in Thermaltake’s cap. Thermaltake advertises varying efficiency numbers from 80% to 87%+, and the Toughpower hit them peaking at 87.5%. Barring any catastrophic failure at 100v the Toughpower is well on its way to being the dominating power supply of our review program.