In Win Classic Series 750W Power Supply Review

It has been years since we have reviewed a computer power supply from In Win. You might remember the In Win name from being a prolific case supplier back in the early enthusiast days of the 1990's. How does In Win stack up in 2016 with its Classic series PSU that has a very sleek look to it and nice feature set?

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Overview

The first thing we are going to look at with the In Win C 750W is its packaging, accessories, and documentation. While normally none of these items is a make or break item for a power supply the packaging quite often contains a lot of information about the product we are purchasing. The inclusion of an owner’s manual that provides actual information about our product is also of great help in many situations. Accessories are almost unnecessary with a power supply as the unit is self contained, unless it is modular, but there cases where a manufacturer can include useful accessories to make installation, routing and use more efficient.

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The packaging of the In Win C 750W is vastly different from what we have previously seen with the In Win Commander series units that we have reviewed. Today's packaging is far less interesting but it is certainly functional and some might say more professional. The front of the package features a pair of pictures of the C 750W from different angles as well as a label that says C 750W and C 900W. Above this, we see a row of seals for various features such as "Skylake Ready", "Modular Cables", "ROHS Complaint", "NVIDIA SLI READY", "AMD CROSSFIRE READY", and the fact that the unit carries a 7 year warranty (which is nice). Just below this, we see an 80 Plus Platinum seal and a quick check of the 80 Plus website does find the unit listed. Moving to the rear of the packaging, we find the power label for both the C 750W and the C 900W along with the connector counts for both the C750 and the C 900W. The labels for the C 750W are reproduced below. Lastly, the sides of the packaging turn up a few advertising points but little else of use.

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From the power information we see here, the In Win C 750W looks like most modern 750W power supplies, generally speaking. Where this unit differs a bit is that while the 12v capacity is 62.5A (or ~100% of the unit’s total capacity if needed) this is split across four 12v rails each with a capacity individually of 25A. These rails are divided up such that there are 1/2 of the PCIe connectors on each of 12v3 and 12v4 with the EPA/P4 AUX connector on 12v2 and the other peripheral and motherboard connectors on 12v1. Speaking of peripherals and the motherboard, the minor rails are limited to 20A each with a total possible combined capacity of 100W. These output capacities and distributions are combined with a total of four PCIe connectors (modified 8-pin), nine SATA connectors, and six MOLEX connectors for your peripheral needs. While this seems about right for a 750W unit, many users who are used to single 12v rail power supplies may give some pause to the configuration of this unit. They shouldn't as, in the end, it should not mean much to them in real world applications.

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Once we open the packaging for the In Win C 750W, we find the unit itself, the power cord, modular cables, mounting screws, and the user manual. The user manual comes in nine languages and spans 14 pages. In those 14 pages we find some advertising, the basic power table for the C 750W and the C 900W, the cable counts for the C 750W and C 900W, warranty information, some installation instructions, and some very basic troubleshooting steps. By no means is the manual detailed, but it has some the basic information you would expect in a user manual. So, let's move on to the unit itself now!