Antec EarthWatts Platinum 750W Power Supply Review

The Antec EarthWatts series of computer power supplies is not truly aimed at the hardcore highend enthusiast, but it certainly ticks some checkboxes that many enthusiasts will find of interest. Namely, Antec states that it is up to 93% efficient. Given that efficiency we should see this 750 watt unit come in at "quiet" levels as well.

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Overview

The first thing we are going to look at with the Antec EA-750 PLATINUM is its packaging, accessories, and documentation. While normally none of these items is a make or break item for a power supply the packaging quite often contains a lot of information about the product we are purchasing. The inclusion of an owner’s manual that provides actual information about our product is also of great help. Accessories are almost unnecessary with a power supply as the unit is self contained, unless it is modular, but there are cases where a manufacturer can include useful accessories to make installation, routing, and use more efficient.

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The Antec EA-750 PLATINUM packaging layout is similar to the most recent Antec units we have seen that were also 750W in capacity. However, this particular product sees a number of differences and it has a bit of a different "feel." One of the most significant parts of the "feel" that is different is the rotation in package layout to a more vertical from horizontal layout and the loss of the product shot. For some reason, this change makes this unit "feel" lower end than those previous units. I have no real reason to give you on why that is the case, it is just a "feel" from looking at the packaging. That said, this unit is slotted in below those units other 750W units so that would make sense. Good product and package design (along with price) by Antec can provide a real, instant, visual differentiation among many products that occupy the same capacity niche. Now, on the front of the package, we start off seeing a line art power supply and then a row of features across the bottom as well as an 80 Plus Platinum sticker in the upper right corner. A quick check of the 80 Plus website does indeed find this unit certified for 80 Plus Platinum efficiency. Looking back at the row of features, we see a max efficiency of 93% listed, along with a bit about "continuous power," and 25% max energy savings. Unfortunately, this marks a return of the truly awful advertising about cost savings that we have discussed on previously reviewed Antec products and, today, it once more fills both the front and on one side of the package. As we move around the rest of the packaging, we also find the power label (reproduced below), the connector count for this unit (reproduced below), a number of advertising points, and the fact that this unit is covered by a 3 year warranty. While not the longest warranty we see going today, the 3 year warranty is probably reasonable for a entry level/mainstream product. We certainly would not be opposed to a longer warranty if Antec wanted to give us one though.

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The Antec EA-750 PLATINUM is indicated as being a quad-12v rail power supply which is something we don't see much of lately but is very much like what the older EarthWatts 750 featured. Each of the EA-750 PLATINUM's 12v rails is advertised as having a capacity of up to 30A which is 5A more than the previous EarthWatts 750 and it has a combined capacity of up to 720W (or 60A) which is an increase of 4A. The rail distribution is once more simple as the PCIe connector pairs are on one 12v rail each, the EPS connector gets its own 12v rail, and everything else ends up on the other 12v rail. Heck, all of this is even labeled in the "user manual" and it is accurate which is excellent. The minor rails have a total capacity of 110W (which is a huge reduction from the 170W on the older EarthWatts 750) and each rail can individually support just 20A (a reduction of 5A each from the older EarthWatts 750). This is a bit interesting as the individual capacity of the minor rails is what we saw from the most recent 750W Antec products we have reviewed while this unit has a larger total combined capacity for the minor rails. Combined with these outputs, we find that this unit has four PCIe connectors, six SATA connectors, and four Molex connectors. Interestingly, with this being a multi-12v rail unit, we see that the PCIe connectors have two connectors per 12v rail and each of those rails has a capacity of 30A. That is a lot of capacity for each pair of PCIe connectors on a 750W unit. With multi-12v rail units under powering things like PCIe connectors is a concern for some users, that should not be an issue with this arrangement today. Other than that, the SATA and Molex numbers seem OK for this product and target market today.

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Once we open the EA-750 PLATINUM packaging, we are left looking at the EA-750 PLATINUM itself, a power cord, some screws, some Velcro straps, a warranty "card," and the "product overview." The documentation is just as bad as what have been seeing from the recent Antec power supplies we have reviewed and, as usual, if you go online to Antec's Product Manual page you can supposedly get a "real" user manual. In previous reviews, that online user manual we were promised was not present or, if it was present, woefully incomplete. Today's manual, however, is actually decent. Included in the digital version of the manual are the relevant electrical specifications, installation instructions, and a bunch of advertising. Certainly this could be better overall, but at least it is not as bad as previous examples. So, while not great, this is a much better effort. So, let's move on to the build quality now.