EVGA SuperNOVA 1300 G2 1300W Power Supply Review

EVGA has a bit of a rocky road with HardOCP when it comes to PSU reviews. Today we give EVGA the opportunity to redeem itself with its 1300 watt powerhouse touting "exceptional efficiency" and a fully modular design that is "silent and optimized for the enthusiast." All this with a 10 year warranty? It must be a badass.

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Build Quality

As we already know the EVGA SuperNOVA 1300 G2 features a single 140mm fan design that is used in the same vein as 120mm fans in that these can provide for quiet cooling environments due to the ability to move a larger volume of air at slower speeds than a smaller diameter fan. The 140mm fan is just short of the largest diameter fan we are likely to see in ATX power supplies given the physical constraints of the form factor. While great for quiet computing environments the key criteria in our evaluation is whether or not the cooling solution is sufficient, not necessarily it’s sound output level or form factor, although we certainly listen for offending units.

External Build Quality

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Externally, the EVGA SuperNOVA 1300 G2 follows in the design footprint of the much larger NEX-1500 Classified. As such, it features a powder coat-like finish that is black with only a few accents. One notable change compared to the NEX-1500 Classified, and the NEX650G, is the fact that the infamous "handle to nowhere" has been eliminated which is great since it is useless in a non-hot swappable unit and only costs money for no reason. Other than that, the exterior is as we expect from a modern overhead fan design that features APFC.

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The EVGA SuperNOVA 1300 G2 itself comes in at ~7 7/8 inches and the cables provide a serviceable length of ~23 to 29 inches to the first or only connector. These cables are sleeved in normal mesh loom in either red or black with most of the sleeving being short of complete as expected.

Internal Build Quality

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Once we open the SuperNOVA 1300 G2, we are left looking at a SuperFlower Leadex based power supply which has a slightly different layout than normal with primary by the rear edge of the PCB and the secondary up against the modular PCB. The topology is an LLC resonant primary with a synchronous rectification secondary that uses DC-DC VRMs for the minor rails. Looking at the layout in general, we see that the unit looks very clean and there are just a few rather small heatsinks which is interesting given how large a capacity this unit represents. These heatsinks are paired with a Globe Fan ball bearing fan rated at 0.6A at 12v; a clear change from earlier reports on this unit. As we flip over the main PCB, we find an OK soldering job that is dotted with a number of places where things were worked by hand in a less than stellar manner, particularly on the secondary side where we have some ugly fixes.

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The primary side starts with the AC input filtering up at the input receptacle where there is a PCB and an X capacitor. The filtering then continues on the PCB where we find that it is mostly complete. As we continue on the primary side, we see the bridge rectifiers sandwiching a black ridged heatsink. Directly behind this is the main heatsink for the primary side and that heatsink contains the PFC power components. Between this heatsink and the edge of the main PCB, we find the APFC coil and the input capacitors are back on the other side of that heatsink. These capacitors are provided by Nippon Chemi-con and they are rated at 680uF 400v 105C.

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Once we move to the secondary, we see the main transformer (marked EVGA) with the MOFETS used for switching on two small heatsinks in front of that. Directly behind the main transformer, we see the heatsinks for the MOSFETS that are doing duty in the synchronous rectification portion of the secondary along with a smattering of Nippon Chemi-con solid and standard electrolytics. Next, we see a pair of add-in PCBs which house the DC-DC VRMs as well as an add-in PCB that houses the fan controller. Moving up to the modular PCB, we see a large plastic shield which SuperFlower has done its best to attach to the PCB so that it will never come off! On the front of this PCB, we see that the board work is outstanding but we have a mix of standard Nippon Chemi-con capacitors (Not a great idea in an area that will get no airflow.) and some CapXon solid capacitors. (Never a good idea.)

Build Quality Summary

The build quality of the EVGA SuperNOVA 1300 G2 is very good overall. The exterior of the unit is well trimmed out and ditches some of the sillier aspects of the last high powered EVGA unit we saw. Gone is the confusing 12v rail layout, the "handle to nowhere," and the messy wiring but the unit does retain the high quality finish and decent trim work. Moving to the interior, we find a modern design in the resonant LLC primary and secondary that features synchronous rectification and DC-DC VRMs. The layout on the main and modular PCBs is also clean with the integration being generally good. However, the back of the main PCB does feature some less than stellar soldering points on the secondary side in particular. The components stocked in the unit are mixed with some excellent and some not so. The standard capacitors are excellent as these are provided by Nippon Chemi-con while Nippon Chemi-con also does provide some of the solid capacitors. The downside is, the other solid capacitors are provided by the much less stellar CapXon. Lastly, we see that the fan is provided by Globe Fan. All in all, the build quality is going to be very good but it is not exactly going to be top notch, let's move on now and see how this unit performs.