Today's Hard|Forum Post
Today's Hard|Forum Post

Antec EDGE 750W Power Supply Review

Antec is easily a go-to brand for many computer hardware enthusiasts and Antec has not been resting on its reputation. Today is the debut of the Antec EDGE 750W. This PSU boasts full modularity, up to 92% efficiency, high quality Japanese capacitors, "Flat Stealth Wires," all riding on two "High Current Rails."

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Build Quality

As we already know the Antec EDGE 750W features a single 135mm fan design that is used in the same vein as 120mm fans in that these can provide for quiet cooling environments due to the ability to move a larger volume of air at slower speeds than a smaller diameter fan. The 135mm fan is just short of the largest diameter fan we are likely to see in ATX power supplies given the physical constraints of the form factor. While great for quiet computing environments the key criteria in our evaluation is whether or not the cooling solution is sufficient, not necessarily it’s sound output level or form factor, although we certainly listen for offending units.

External Build Quality

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The external build quality of the Antec EDGE 750W is rather interesting. The unit’s layout is typical of what we see for single overhead fan designs with a modular interface and APFC. However, the housing itself is honeycombed on the sides as well as the rear. The honeycombing on the sides though is covered by a plastic sheet so in reality there isn't any airflow from this and this treatment is just for looks. The modular interface is well constructed and even labels which 12v rail feeds which modular connector and that is good to see. One other thing to notice here on the modular interface is the presence of the little switch that says LED On/Off. I missed this at first and when I first turned the unit on I was a bit surprised by the bright blue/white light that flashed on and I almost thought "I have blown the unit up right out of the gate!" The finish is generally well done with a slightly textured black that is today's "boring beige" and this is set off just by the Antec logos found on the side of the housing and the slightly "Chrysler-esque" wire guard on the fan.

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The EDGE 750W comes in at a total length of ~6 5/8 inches while the cables come in at a length of ~22" (most cables) to 27" (EPS) to the first or only connector. Additionally, the cables are all sleeved in black mesh which is very close to being complete while the FlexForce style cables are completely sleeved.

Internal Build Quality

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Once we open the top of the Antec EDGE 750W, we see the same platform from Seasonic that we saw with the S12-G/G-Series with a few tweaks that are similar to what we saw from XFX with the XTR 750W. The layout of the unit is again mostly traditional with the topology being a resonant LLC primary with a synchronous rectification secondary and DC-DC VRMs for the minor rails. From the top, we see four rather small (gold anodized) heatsinks paired with an Hong Hua FDB fan rated at 0.5A at 12v. When we flip the PCB over, we see the typically neat soldering of Seasonic as well as the 12v MOSFETs and 12v Schottky diodes.

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Starting on the primary side, as with the previous G-Series based units we have seen, the input filtering begins up on the housing itself with a PCB that houses X capacitors, Y capacitors, and a coil. It then trails onto the main PCB where we find that it has more than just the minimum necessary components. Perpendicular to the main heatsink on the primary side, we see a small heatsink that houses the bridge rectifier. The large heatsink that is on the edge of the main PCB houses the PFC power components. Towards the back edge of the main PCB, we see the main input capacitor which is provided by Rubycon and it is rated at 420v 470uF 105C. Between this capacitor and the actual edge of the PCB is an add-in PCB that houses the resonant and PFC controllers. Lastly, the heatsink that is towards the center of the unit houses the main switching transistors.

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Moving over to the secondary side, we again see that the most prominent feature with this design is the add-in PCB that is housing the DC-DC VRMs and this PCB is attached to a heatsink. Contained on this, and around this PCB on the main PCB, we find a number of solid capacitors provided by Enesol. The standard electrolytics we find hanging around are provided by Nippon Chemi-con. The other add-in PCB we find on this side of the unit houses the protection circuitry. As this unit is modular, the wiring is bundled and routed up to the modular PCB. This PCB is generally very cleanly constructed and extremely well soldered. We do find a number of capacitors here on the front of this PCB and these are a mix of Enesol solid capacitors and Nippon Chemi-con standard capacitors. While both are good to excellent capacitors in general, the standard capacitors are going to suffer much more than the solid ones here with the lack of airflow.

Build Quality Summary

The overall build quality of the Antec EDGE 750W is excellent and, like the XFX XTR 750W with which it shares almost everything in common, it is a bit better than the other G-Series based units we have seen to date. The exterior build quality of of this unit is excellent and it has a bit of unique look to it with the mostly perforated housing like we have seen on some fanless power supplies. This unit is also completely modular which will be of interest to a lot of users and those modular connections are well labeled. When we move to the interior, we see that this unit varies very little from other G-Series based units. The topology is thoroughly modern, the electrolytics are high quality (Enesol for the solid and Nippon Chemi-con or Rubycon for the standard), and the integration is top notch. We also see that this unit again features a higher quality Hong Hua FDB fan which is a nice upgrade over what we see in most power supplies including the Seasonic version of this unit. Lastly, the actual integration is very very clean and it has an excellent soldering job. So, let’s move on to the load testing now and see how this unit performs.