ASUS P8Z77-V Deluxe LGA 1155 Motherboard Review

The ASUS P8Z77-V Deluxe comes from an outstanding pedigree as virtually every board in the ASUS P8xxx series has been excellent. Is this another tremendously worthy entry in the lineup or does this one shy away from its heritage? Read on to learn about our experiences with the P8Z77-V Deluxe.

Introduction

ASUS is one of the world's largest and most popular motherboard manufacturers. It is certainly a brand that most if not all PC enthusiasts are well acquainted with in one way or another. And while it is generally known for motherboards ASUS has diversified into graphics cards, networking products, monitors, and more. ASUS offers many of these products in various price points for budget builds to virtually unlimited budget builds. Specifically the board in question today is a mid-range offering in the P8Z77 line. A line we are quite familiar with here at HardOCP.

The ASUS P8xxx family dates back to the P67 chipset era and virtually all the boards we've reviewed in that line across all those chipsets has been nothing short of excellent, often setting the bar for what other motherboard manufacturers have to compete with. From an enthusiast perspective some boards are definitely better than others. Some of the more stripped down boards leave something to be desired in the overclocking arena as the lack of power phases proves to hinder your overclock slightly. That being said, none of these boards were bad by any means. Some were just better than others and ASUS has set the bar quite high for itself.

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The ASUS P8Z77-V Deluxe is again a mid-range offering in the P8xxx line and is based on Intel's Z77 Express chipset. As such it offers everything you can expect from a Z77 board and more. Support for 32GB of DDR3 RAM, USB 3.0, SATA 6Gbs/, CrossFireX and SLI, LucidLogix Virtu MVP, Intel HD graphics, Quick Sync video, Smart Response Technology, Smart Connect Technology, and more. Additionally, as an enthusiast board, ASUS built it with a robust power design. Utilizing a 20 phase power design built to Intel's VRD 12.5 specifications (16 for the CPU and 4 for the iGPU). It should have a solid foundation for overclocking. ASUS included support for some additional features such as WiFi support, Bluetooth, MemOK, AI charger, anti-surge support, BIOS Flashback and more.

Main Specifications Overview:

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Detailed Specifications Overview:

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Packaging

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The board ships in a slightly fancier than normal motherboard box with a flap showing off information about the board's features as well as giving us a window to view the board while it's inside the box. Inside are the following accessories; User guide, I/O shield, driver disc, Wi-Fi Go! adapter, Q-connectors, SATA cables, Wi-Fi Antennas, and an SLI bridge.

Board Layout

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The board's layout itself is well executed with no major problem areas I can think of. About the only complaint I can really make is with regard to the location of the onboard power and reset buttons. I think these should always be on one of the front corners of the board regardless of chassis design rather than under the expansion card area which is certainly problematic if you are using multiple GPUs.

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CPU socket is too close to the DIMM slots. Nothing anyone can do about that, so I blame Intel for the design. Moving on the area looks crowded but it's not really all that bad. Still the DIMM slots can be a problem unless you use low-profile DIMMs and or cooling systems like the self-contained water cooling setups which are so popular these days. The MOSFETs are cooled using a fairly robust heat sink with heat pipes in it.

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There are four DIMM slots for a maximum supported memory configuration of 32GB. ASUS again uses the same color coded DIMM slots which use only one retention tab per slot. This is a good design and is now the ASUS standard even though this board didn't need it. No complaints here.

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The Z77 Express chipset is found in front and in between the PCIe x16 slots. It is cooled with a large, flat passive heatsink. Directly in front of that are the board's many SATA ports which use locking-right angled connectors. My favorite.

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The expansion slot area is well done with no legacy slots. That's what I like to see. If you need PCI slots then ASUS has other offerings in the P8xxx series which are definitely worth your attention. But for those not interested in legacy hardware, the P8Z77-V Deluxe is well suited for the needs of most people. A PLX chip ensures the necessary bandwidth needed for multi-GPU configurations. NVIDIA's SLI and Quad-SLI technologies are supported here, but not 3-Way SLI. 3-Way CrossFireX is supported on the AMD side.

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The I/O panel is packed with ports. 4 USB 2.0, 6 USB 3.0, 2 eSATA, 2 RJ-45, 6 mini-stereo jacks, BIOS Flashback button, optical output, HDMI and DisplayPort are all provided. There is also a connector for the included Wi-Fi Go! adapter.


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