Kingwin LZP-550 550W Power Supply Review

Kingwin does not really have too much to say about its new LZP-550 PSU. One thing that will surely catch your enthusiast eye is the fact that this is likely the first 80Plus Platinum rated power supply you have seen in the overclockers realm. Kingwin does mention this unit is "overclocked" as well. 650 watts for the price of 550 watts? Uh, no.

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Build Quality

As we already know from Kingwin’s packaging the LZP-550 features a single fan design. The single 140mm fan is in the same vein as the preferred standard of a single 120mm fan. The 140mm fan is obviously larger and used for quiet cooling due to its ability to move a larger volume of air at lower RPM than a smaller diameter fan. This is the largest fan we have ever seen in a power supply and SuperFlower was one of the first manufacturers to begin using this design, but recently companies such as CWT have begun to as well. Additionally, given the size constraints of the ATX12v form factor a 140mm fan is most likely the largest size fan that can fit in a standard width ATX power supply. The 140mm fan should give excellent cooling and be very quiet so long as it is paired with a good fan controller. At the same time, the key criteria in our evaluation is whether or not the cooling solution is sufficient, not necessary its sound level or form factor.

External Build Quality

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Externally the Kingwin LZP-550 is very similar to the LZG-1000 and the LZ-1000 we have previously reviewed. The exterior is finished with a black brushed finish that is rather attractive and handles abuse rather well. The unit is once more dominated by the 140mm fan used for cooling the power supply; however unlike the LED lit fans of previous units this fan is white. On the rear of the unit there is an APFC sticker indicating that the unit has APFC and is full range. When we move back to the front of the unit we see that the modular connector interface is once more the universal mini-fit JR style Crystal Cube plastic connectors like we saw with the LZ-1000 and LZG-1000. I have said it each time we have seen these connectors, if you are going to go with something different why not go with the metal coax style connectors from the Mach 1 units? Anyway, last up we see the cheesy Lazer sticker is stuck on the side of the unit again but with the word "Platinum" adorning it this time. The good news is a razor blade took it off easily.

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The Kingwin LZP-550 itself is ~7 1/8 inches long while the fixed and modular cables provide a serviceable length of ~21 inches to the first or only connector except for the EPS cable which reaches out to ~24 inches. The sleeving is a mix between black wire loom on the fixed cables and flat FlexForce style on the modular connectors. All in all, the sleeving on these cables is all very complete and well secured.

Internal Build Quality

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Once we open the Kingwin LZP-550 we notice that we are again looking at another resonant LLC design from SuperFlower similar to what we saw in the LZG-1000. The general layout for this unit is very similar but there are a few interesting little changes here and there through the unit. We also see that we have picked up gold painted heatsinks. This being an 80Plus Platinum unit, so why not platinum colored heatsinks? Anyway... The fan charged with cooling this unit is a bit of a curve ball as it is labeled as a Kingwin fan and there is zero identifying information about its specs on the fan hub. It seems unlikely that Kingwin is actual the manufacturer of the fan, but other than what we can identify visually (such as that the fan is a 140mm ball bearing fan) there isn’t much to go by at the moment. Lastly, when we flip the PCB over and look at the soldering it appears to be mostly well done, though there are a few places on the secondary side that could have been done better, but overall a very good job soldering.

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On the primary side we find the input filtering starts on the PCB itself, not up on the AC input receptacle. As we move on around to the primary side proper we find that unlike the last LLC resonant design from SuperFlower that we saw this unit has a single main capacitor. This capacitor is provided by Nippon Chemi-con and is rated at 400v 560uF 105C. Along with a relay and the APFC coil in front of the heatsink, we also see a number of Y and X capacitors that are part of the input filtering housed in this area as well. The heatsink sitting behind all of this houses the bridge rectifier as well as the APFC power components and the switching transistors.

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Moving over to the secondary side we again see a modern synchronous rectification scheme that utilizes an add-in PCB with solid capacitors for the DC-DC VRM’s. There are a few standard electrolytic capacitors still on this side and they are provided by Nippon Chemi-con. The secondary is also host to a large number of solid capacitors, which differs from the last secondary design like this that we saw from SuperFlower, and these solid capacitors are provided by Nippon Chemi-con as well. We can also see here that once more this unit was originally designed as a multi 12v rail unit (five 12v rails in fact) but it has had those 12v rails bridged back together to give us today's single rail Kingwin product. Woven throughout the secondary is the wiring which is bundled with zip ties and the fixed wires exits the housing through the wire guard. The remaining wires lead to the modular interface which is again generally well constructed. We do see that unlike previous Kingwin/SuperFlower units that wire that is usually affixed to the rear of the modular PCB to increase the current carrying capacity is nowhere to be seen which gives this unit a much more professional look. There are also a few small Nippon Chemi-con capacitors on the modular interface as well between the PCB and the housing.

Build Quality Summary

The last few Kingwin power supplies we reviewed have seen a steady increase in construction quality and design with today’s LZP-550 continuing in that trend. The exterior build quality of previous Kingwin units has never been a low point (save for the kind of cheesy Lazer sticker which shows up again today) and today we find that again it is not. Indeed, the external build quality of this unit is very similar to the LZG-1000 and differs only slightly. The finish is once more excellent, the cables are once more well constructed, and the modular interface features the same universal connections as before. On the interior we again see a very well built unit featuring a very modern LLC resonant synchronous rectification DC-DC based design like we saw with the LZG-1000. Some of the differences here are upgraded capacitors as in this unit we have all Nippon Chemi-con capacitors and a much more liberal use of solid capacitors. This is coupled with a generally well constructed unit that shows good integration. The exterior of the unit this is one of the better looking we units we have seen once it is sans stickers. So far the build quality and topology truly give the Seasonic X-Series a run for its money (which is certainly saying something), and these items represent an excellent maturation for the product lines that Kingwin has carried over the last few years. So let’s go see if we can break this thing now!