Kingwin LZP-550 550W Power Supply Review

Kingwin does not really have too much to say about its new LZP-550 PSU. One thing that will surely catch your enthusiast eye is the fact that this is likely the first 80Plus Platinum rated power supply you have seen in the overclockers realm. Kingwin does mention this unit is "overclocked" as well. 650 watts for the price of 550 watts? Uh, no.

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Overview

The first thing we are going to look at with the Kingwin LZP-550 is its packaging, accessories, and documentation. While normally none of these items is a make or break item for a power supply the packaging quite often contains a lot of information about the product we are purchasing. The inclusion of an owner’s manual that provides actual information about our product is also of great help. Accessories are almost unnecessary with a power supply as the unit is self contained, unless it is modular, but there are cases where a manufacturer can include useful accessories to make installation, routing, and use more efficient.

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The packaging for the Kingwin LZP-550 is large and trimmed in black and, in what I am guessing is supposed to be, platinum. The color match for platinum on the packaging isn’t close though in my opinion but this is perhaps not that important of an issue. On the front of the packaging we find the 80Plus Platinum seal, a 5 year warranty, and a little bit of information about the units "Special ECO Intelligent Thermal Control System". A quick check of the 80Plus website does indeed find this unit rated for 80Plus Platinum. In addition to this change in the Lazer lineup we find another more important change in the now 5 year warranty of this product. I am going to stop for a second because we should definitely acknowledge Kingwin for stepping up its support here as the very first Kingwin power supply we reviewed had a 1 year warranty, which we chided it for. Then the next two units had 3 year warranties, which we acknowledged as being better but still chided it a bit. Today however, we see that Kingwin has moved its support bar up another notch and hit the 5 year mark. With that being the case, we simply will say thank you Kingwin for stepping up through the review process over the last few years and improving the baseline support of its PSU products and showing that us that the company believes in it own products. Moving on now, when we swing over to the back of the packaging we don’t see any SLI or CrossFire certifications and at the time of writing we don’t find the unit certified for either multi-GPU configuration either. What we do find is a long list of advertising bullet points, and two interesting pieces of copy. The first interesting piece is the information about the "ECO Intelligent Thermal Control System" (I guess when it is on the back of the packaging it isn’t Special) which will be discussed in the Load Testing Audio Impressions section. The second interesting tidbit is the blurb that says "550W Real Power Platinum Rating" "Overclock Version" "Can be overclocked to 650W continuous at 80+ Gold Rating." The polite way to put this is that power supplies can’t be "overclocked" like a CPU or GPU or, well, at all. What Kingwin means to say here is "Our OCP set points let this power supply reach 650W and we would have rated it at that output level but it only does 80Plus gold efficiency levels then so we rated it at 550W where it meets the 80Plus Platinum certification level." That doesn’t sound as exciting to the marketing department does it? Anyway, there is no "overclocking" just a capacity of up to 650W under some relaxed standards so let’s move on and look at the power and connector information.

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The power information for the Kingwin LZP-550 is made into a rather convoluted scenario due to the "overclock version" mumbo-jumbo that gives us a 550W power label and a 650W power label. To begin with, let's just look at the legitimate power label which is the 550W label. When we look at that label we see that the unit has available up to ~99% of its capacity on the 12v rail (45.5A) if needed. The minor rails have a rather low maximum combined rating of 100W with each individual rail being limited to just 20A. This is coupled with 5 Molex, 8 SATA, two 6-pin PCI-Express connectors, and two modified 8-pin PCI-Express connectors. So while not rated for SLI at this time, this unit could physically support many iterations of SLI. That being said, 4 PCI-Express connectors on a 550W unit might be a bit overreaching. If nothing else, this configuration ensures that there are likely to be very few times where this unit will be under equipped in this regard.

Now when we look at the "overclock version" label we see that the unit has an increased 12v capacity of 54A as well as an increased 5v capacity of 24A and an increased 3.3v capacity of 22A. All of this taken together gives us a new total capacity of 650W of which the 3.3v/5v rails are capped at 110W and the 12v rail is capped at 648W in any combination up to the that 650W total capacity. This is a very nice increase over the base line 550W rating of the unit, but it can't be stressed enough that this is not really any sort of "overclock." However, if the unit is capable of doing this 650W continuously in our testing at 80Plus Gold levels and 550W at 80Plus Platinum levels then we can probably forgive the horrible marketing.

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Once we open the LZP-550 retail box we find the power supply, power cable, mounting screws, modular cables in a bag, the user manual, and a warning label like we saw with some of the Seasonic X-Series units. The warning label with this unit reads "Fan does not operate when the power supply has just been switch on is a normal circumstance. Please refer to the user manual for more detailed information." The truth surrounding this operation is a bit more complicated than that and is covered in more detail in our Load Testing Audio Impressions section. The user manual that accompanies this unit is 6 pages long in English only. The manual is like many we have seen from SuperFlower OEM units in the past and has the connectors listed, pinouts for the connectors, some basic electrical specifications that relate to the protection circuitry, a few troubleshooting steps, and a rather detailed explanation of the fan operation. What it is lacking though is somewhat extensive as there is no information about the actual power output of the unit (including the so called "overclock version" features), warranty, etc. So while having the important information about the highly touted fan operation, it is missing some very basic information, and information pertaining to one of its other "unique" features. This manual could definitely use a lot of work.