Raidmax RX-1000AE 1000W Power Supply Review

Raidmax touts its new RX-1000AE as being a PSU that is "environmentally friendly." Given the fact that it boasts an 80 Plus Gold Certified rating, it is poised to supply us with some of the best efficiency levels we have ever seen out of PSU, much less one that hits the 1 kilowatt mark.

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Load Testing

For those of you that are curious as to some of the reasoning and equipment behind our PSU testing program here at HardOCP, we have put together a living document that shares a lot of the behind the scenes of the program. The testing we are conducting today is exactly as described in that document and will begin with a range of loads tested at 120v input including our torture test and then move on to the same set of tests at 100v input but without the torture test.

120v Load Testing Results

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Test #1 is equal to approximately 25% of the rated capacity of the Raidmax RX-1000AE at 45c. This makes Test #1 equal to 251W by loading the 12v rails to a combined 19a, the 5v rail to 2a, the 3.3v rail to 1a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. Test #1 sees all of the positive DC output voltages starting off above nominal with the minor rails being the highest above nominal in absolute magnitude. The efficiency during this test is starting off surprisingly low at 84.23% while the exhaust temperature is also starting off low at 48C.

Test #2 is equal to approximately 50% of the rated capacity of the Raidmax RX-1000AE at 45c. This makes Test #2 equal to 493W by loading the 12v rails to a combined 38a, the 5v rail to 4a, the 3.3v rail to 3a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. Test #2 sees all of the positive DC output voltages drop with the peak drop being 0.1v on one of the 12v rails. The efficiency has moved up in this test, but only to 85.15%, with an exhaust temperature of 55C.

Test #3 is equal to approximately 75% of the rated capacity of the Raidmax RX-1000AE at 45c. This makes Test #3 equal to 744W by loading the 12v rails to 57a, the 5v rail to 7a, the 3.3v rail to 5a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. Test #3 sees the DC output voltages drop by up to 0.12v on the 12v rails while minor rails drop by up to 0.04v. The efficiency has dropped off of Test #2’s high value as it hits 83.60%. The exhaust temperature has moved up once more and now hits 59C.

Test #4 is equal to approximately 100% of the rated capacity of the Raidmax RX-1000AE at 45c. This makes Test #4 equal to 981W by loading the 12v rails to 76a, the 5v rail to 10a, the 3.3v rail to 6a, the +5vsb to 2a, and the -12v to 0.5a. In the final regular test, the DC output voltages end down again with the 12v rails dropping by up to 0.09v. The minor rails drop by less, peaking at 0.03v, which is good. The efficiency has really plummeted however, and in this test it hits 81.48%.

120v Load Testing Summary

The Raidmax RX-1000AE passes our 120v load tests, however there are a few points of note here. The first thing to address is the efficiency. The last time we saw this basic topology from Andyson, in the guise of the Ultra X4’s, those units did not even come close to their 80Plus Silver rating so the idea that it would somehow be 80Plus Gold today was rather far out there to begin with. In our tests the unit only managed to range from 81.48% to 85.15% and since those values were not significantly better than the X4 1050W and the X4 1050W, which were not even close to the 80Plus Silver those units were advertised as being, there was no point in putting this dog through the 80Plus tests. Quite simply it would be a waste of time. Not much else to say about this other than something seems to be up with these units from Andyson and 80Plus. Honestly, 80Plus should be concerned with its seal of efficiency showing up on these units. Moving on, the voltage regulation for this unit was once more rather loose with a peak 12v drop of 0.31v and 0.09v on the 3.3v rail. Lastly, the unit saw a peak exhaust temperature here of 66C. Let’s move on now to see if the RX-1000AE passes our 100v load testing.