Diablotek PHD650 650W Power Supply Review

There is no better mix than the Devil and technology, but that aside, how the devil does that work out for power supplies? We aim to find out and as we all know, when it comes to PSUs, the devil is in the details. Surely this PSU is straight from Hell.

continued...

Build Quality

As we already know from Diablotek’s packaging the PHD650 650W features a single fan design. The single 140mm fan is in the same vein as the preferred standard of a single 120mm fan. The 140mm fan is obviously larger and used for quiet cooling due to its ability to move a larger volume of air at lower RPM than a smaller diameter fan. This is the largest fan we have ever seen in a power supply and SuperFlower was one of the first manufacturers to begin using this design, but recently companies such as CWT have begun to as well. Additionally, given the size constraints of the ATX12v form factor a 140mm fan is most likely the largest size fan that can fit in a standard width ATX power supply. The 140mm fan should give excellent cooling and be very quiet so long as it is paired with a good fan controller. At the same time, the key criteria in our evaluation is whether or not the cooling solution is sufficient, not necessary its sound level or form factor.

External Build Quality

Article Image Article Image Article Image

Article Image

Externally, the Diablotek PHD650 is finished in a flat black paint and GIANT wrap around sticker that also serves as the warranty seal. The GIANT sticker is much like what we saw on the units packaging and is adorned in Green, Black, and the T1000-esque head again. It is not the best looking unit we have seen ever, not by a long shot, and is likely not something you are going to want to have hanging out in a windowed case. Moving on, the top of the unit is dominated by a huge 140mm fan which, if paired with a good fan controller, should make this unit very quiet. When we flip around to the back of the unit we see that the unit has a rather standard layout of honeycombing to allow airflow, and a voltage selector switch indicating the unit is not full range and lacks APFC.

Article Image Article Image

The Diablotek PHD650 itself is ~6 1/2 inches long while the fixed cables provide a serviceable length of ~16 inches to the first or only connector. The sleeving on the cabling is surprisingly well done and complete.

Internal Build Quality

Article Image Article Image Article Image

Article Image Article Image

Once we open the Diablotek PHD650, things go from slightly sketchy to fugly, and fast. We are left looking at a super cheap super low end, surprisingly, double forward group regulated single layer PCB power supply. Golden Tiger is one of those unknown random Chinese OEM's and there is nothing in the first impression here that makes that seem like a good thing. As we move on, perhaps the best thing we see about this unit is it's soldering which is passable. The fan used to cool the unit is a sleeve bearing fan branded as Fujian rated at 0.25A 12v.

Article Image Article Image Article Image

Article Image

Surprisingly, we find that the input filtering, which starts on the little PCB attached to the AC input receptacle, is mostly complete on this unit. Moving over around to the primary side proper we see that the bridge rectifier is standing next to the input filtering capacitors, sans heatsink, which are branded LCZ and rated at 1200uF 250v 85C.

Article Image Article Image

As we swing over to the secondary side we see the two coils here indicating the group regulated nature of this unit. We also see a very sparse (sparse being the polite way of saying tragically incomplete and low quality) secondary that is filled out with BH capacitors. The wiring is at least sleeved all the way back into the power supply, and that is perhaps the best thing about the entirety of the secondary.

Build Quality Summary

The overall build quality of the Diablotek PHD650 is bad. By "bad" we mean awful. And by "awful" we mean, "Who the hell put a 650W label on this unit?" and "What were they smoking?" The exterior of the unit is nothing special but the huge sticker covering the majority of the unit is ugly, to say the least. When we move to the interior the unit really falls apart though with its older topology, single layer PCB, atrocious secondary, and horrible component choices. The capacitor selection features LCZ primaries and BH secondaries and are selections we would not want to see in any power supply, ever. The build quality section of this unit is on the short side today since the build quality is a lot on the short side, and three pages of "total crap" over and over and over again would probably look like an introduction from The Simpson's.

Let's move on and see what happens when we actually hook this power supply up to the SM8800 load tester, which honestly is something I look forward to, but Kyle does not since he had to pay to fix the $5000 load tester when crappy PSUs help me blow it up.