Seasonic M12II-620 Power Supply Review

Seasonic is back with an old favorite aiming to make it better for the end user by giving you now Bronze level 80 Plus certification. Our tests are more harsh than 80 Plus' tests, so let's see how exactly Seasonic's new M12II 620 watt PSU takes to our more stringent testing conditions.

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Overview

The first thing we are going to look at with the Seasonic M12II-620Bronze is its packaging, accessories, and documentation. While normally none of these items is a make or break item for a power supply the packaging quite often contains a lot of information about the product we are purchasing. The inclusion of an owner’s manual that provides actual information about our product is also of great help. Accessories are almost unnecessary with a power supply as the unit is self contained, unless it is modular, but there are cases where a manufacturer can include useful accessories to make installation, routing, and use more efficient.

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The Seasonic M12II-620Bronze packaging's color scheme reminds us a lot of that which we saw with the M12D-850 with its orange, yellow, and black motif. As is typical for most retail power supplies the box is covered in marketing points and a number of other helpful/interesting certifications or features. Among those found on this unit are the power table (reproduced below), an 80Plus Bronze seal, Energy Star seal, a SLI ready seal, and a number of marketing points including that the unit has 105C rated capacitors. A quick check of the 80Plus website finds that the advertised 80Plus Bronze values are indeed posted. Additionally, we have an SLI certification on the box but a quick check of the SLIZone website finds that the unit is not certified for any level of SLI at the time of writing. However, the S12II-620Bronze is certified for 8800GTX SLI so it would seem to reason that this unit should be capable of powering similar configurations. Lastly, the unit is advertised as having a 5 year warranty on the front of the box, but a 3 year warranty on the back. This begs the question of which is it, or are we supposed to just average the two?

Editor's Note: Checking Seasonic's USA product web page, you will find at the bottom of the page that Seasonic notes a "5 Year Warranty."

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Overall the picture painted by the Seasonic power label is that of a good modern midlevel power supply. The unit has ~93% of its DC output capacity available on the 12v rail (there is only one as there is no OCP set on the individual "rails") which is good for modern systems. This single 12v rail due to no OCP settings is similar to what we saw some time ago from the S12II 500W and really not that unusual for Seasonic units (why they continue to be labeled dual rail units though is unknown). This generous single 12v rail is coupled with the nine Molex and six SATA connectors for all of your peripheral needs as well as a pair PCI-Express connectors (one is an 8-pin PCI-Express connector) for your new single Fermi card builds should be inclined to go in such a direction. Overall though, this unit should satisfy the vast majority of users' connector requirements.

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Once we open the M12II-620Bronze we find the usual assortment of items including the power supply, the power cable, mounting screws, modular cables in a bag, and the user manual. The user manual that comes with the M12II-620Bronze is 36 pages long in 9 languages and has some information in it which is all labeled as being for the M12II-500, odd. Included in the manual is the power table, the connector count, derating information ("The rated power will reduce from 100% to 80% from 40C to 50C linearly"), and some basic installation instructions. Noticeably absent from the manual is the warranty information once more although according to Seasonic's website it is 5 years. Overall, the manual is of some use but it is not the best and really falls down on warranty information, and the whole being for the M12II-500 thing doesn't help either. Ok, so maybe the manual is actually useless for the most part.