Newegg Selling Fake Intel CPUs

Did you just order an Intel Core i7-920 CPU from Newegg? Have you opened the box yet to check and see what is inside of it? We highly suggest you do.

Fake Intel CPUs at Newegg

UPDATE - 03/08/10

Statement from Newegg:

Newegg is currently conducting a thorough investigation surrounding recent shipments of questionable Intel Core i7-920 CPUs purchased from Newegg.com. Initial information we received from our supplier, IPEX, stated that they had mistakenly shipped us "demo units." We have since come to discover the CPUs were counterfeit and are terminating our relationship with this supplier. Contrary to any speculation, D&H Distributing is not the vendor that supplied us with the Intel Core i7-920 CPUs in question.

Newegg’s top priority is to proactively reach out to all customers who may have been affected to ensure their absolute satisfaction. We have already sent out a number of replacement units and are doing everything in our power to resolve the matter promptly and with the least amount of inconvenience to our customers. We have always taken pride in providing an exceptional experience for each customer, and we apologize for any inconvenience to our valued customers. We take matters like this extremely seriously, and are working in close cooperation with Intel and the appropriate law enforcement authorities to thoroughly investigate this incident.

Updated article from HardOCP.

After talking to several sources on this, it seems that Newegg was in fact selling counterfeit Intel processors.

A fake Intel Core i7-920 was delivered to the hands of HardForum user Vincent Waller in Oregon, AKA "Nix." He reported his find to other HardForum users Thursday afternoon.

From the pictures below, supplied by Vincent, you can see that someone did a fairly good job of hiding the obviousness of what was being traded off as a genuine Intel processor.

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From the outside of the box, you can see where a cursory glance would pass these off as real. Once you open the box, which is supposed to be sealed till it gets to the customer, you can easily see that things are not right. The "book" of blank pages stapled together is supposed to be the instruction manual. Checking out the label on the box you see that it is very believable.

Another source is telling us that 300 counterfeit processors were purchased by Newegg from D&H Distributing and that the fakes were delivered last week in a shipment totaling 2000 pieces. It was also communicated to me that Newegg has now "discovered" all 300 counterfeit processors.

Vincent did contact Newegg customer service and got a real Intel Core i7 processor on the way. I bet they checked the packaging and holographic stamp a bit closer this time.

Talking to Intel on this, it stated:

...our security/tech support guys have a few incidents on this today they are investigating. Stay tuned!

The question left is how exactly did D&H get 300 counterfeit CPUs into its inventory?

Here is another video of a YouTube user that got the same thing as our reader.

And another forum thread with more pictures as well.

UPDATE 03/05/2010 - 7:52PM CST:

DBA Public Relations has contacted us with the following statement.

"Newegg is aware of a shipping error that occurred with certain recent orders of the Intel Core i7-920 CPU. After investigating the issue internally it appears one of our long term partners mistakenly shipped a small number of demo boxes instead of functional units. Our customer service team has already begun proactively reaching out to the affected customers. In line with our commitment to ensure total customer satisfaction, we are doing everything in our power to resolve the issue as soon as possible and with the least amount of inconvenience to our customers."

For the record, I am not buying that story.

Update 03/07/2010 - 4:18PM CST:

To be a bit more specific as to what I "do not buy" about Newegg's story, let me explain. I do not think the statement about these units being "demo boxes" is true. We have now gotten a direct statement from Intel that backs up our thoughts on that specific issue.

Update 03/08/2010 - 11:12AM CST:

Newegg is moving forward telling its customers that counterfeit processors were "demo versions." Intel says that is not true.

Update 03/08/2010 - 6:45PM CST:

This is a press release made by Newegg today via the company’s Facebook page on Monday March 8th. Contrary to the information we received through an inside source claiming that D&H Distributing supplied the fake CPUs, Newegg states the following:

Newegg is currently conducting a thorough investigation surrounding recent shipments of questionable Intel Core i7-920 CPUs purchased from Newegg.com. Initial information we received from our supplier, IPEX, stated that they had mistakenly shipped us "demo units." We have since come to discover the CPUs were counterfeit and are terminating our relationship with this supplier. Contrary to any speculation, D&H Distributing is not the vendor that supplied us with the Intel Core i7-920 CPUs in question.

Newegg’s top priority is to proactively reach out to all customers who may have been affected to ensure their absolute satisfaction. We have already sent out a number of replacement units and are doing everything in our power to resolve the matter promptly and with the least amount of inconvenience to our customers. We have always taken pride in providing an exceptional experience for each customer, and we apologize for any inconvenience to our valued customers. We take matters like this extremely seriously, and are working in close cooperation with Intel and the appropriate law enforcement authorities to thoroughly investigate this incident.

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